Your very own skincare makeover

 

Detox your beauty cupboards with Victorian Cosmetic Institute’s Lisa Brown’s edit of what to keep, what to cull and what to invest in now.

 

Cleanser

Why use it?: to gently nurture the skin while removing dirt, surface impurities and make-up. 

Look for: a simple list of ingredients, including plant surfactants and cleansing agents such as kiwi and coconut sugar extract. Aloe vera, peppermint and cucumber will soothe and calm the skin and naturally maintain PH levels. For oily skins, opt for a deep cleanser with plant extracts to decongest the skin and remove impurities. Everyone else, stick to mild versions.

Avoid: stripping the skin of its natural oils, and creating nasty irritations and rashes. Avoid ingredients such as sodium lauryl sulphates (SLS), propylene glycol, isopropyl, mineral oils, synthetic colours and fragrances and parabens. 

Still unsure? Compare some of your store-bought cleanser’s ingredient list to those of your household cleaning products – yep, scary. 

 

Moisturiser

Why use it?: moisturisers have larger molecules that coat the service of the skin, acting as a sealant and stopping the skin from losing moisture. On the other hand, serum-based hydrators have the ingredients and delivery system to penetrate deeper into the skin, hydrating from within. 

Look for: hyaluronic acid and vitamin B – a naturally occurring hydrator already found in our skin. 

Avoid: using the wrong type of product. A very dry skin will either be lacking in lipids – which are oils – or lacking in hydration. An acne skin or an oily skin should opt for a hydrator rather than a moisturiser. An older skin – which is lipid and moisture dry – will often need both a hydrator and a moisturiser.

Exfoliator 

Why use it?: to remove the dead skin cells that rest on the surface of the skin, making it look dull, dry and uneven. 

Look for: chemical exfoliators with ingredients such as lactic acid, fruit enzyme and salicylic acid. These ingredients work to release the dead skin cells and dissolve and digest the dirt and sebum from the pores. 

Avoid: over-exfoliating, as it disrupts natural cell turnover and can lead to irritation, skin sensitivity and broken capillaries. Physical exfoliators that use micro beads, refined shells from fruit pips or other grains are too abrasive for the face.

 

Make-up 

Why use it?: well, you don’t have to, but if you do, make sure it’s a natural extension of your healthy skincare regimen – after all, it sits on your skin for eight hours of the day!

Look for: mineral make-ups that are rich in vitamin A, B and E and have a built-in sunscreen.  

Avoid: make-ups containing parabens, fragrances, binders and synthetic dyes. Dimethicone is a silicone often used in make-up to help the skin feel silky and to reduce the appearance of fine lines. While it may look great, it can congest the pores and be really damaging.  Make-up brands also use talc as a filler, blocking pores and causing congestion. 

NEXT: Looking for more beauty tips? Head to our beauty section. 

 

{nomultithumb}

 

Medicine ball workout

Get your cardio fix and target your upper body with this medicine ball workout by Theresa Jenn Lopetrone. 

teresacore_main.jpg

Images by Dave Laus.

Complete this routine as a timed circuit or do five rounds (20 reps each exercise). 

The gist:

A medicine ball is a weighted ball roughly about 35 centimetres in diameter, and comes in a variety of weights from one kg to 11 kg. They are inexpensive, and available in hard plastic, dense rubber or synthetic leather material. 

Medicine balls add a twist to your current workout to keep it challenging enough to elicit progress. This workout is designed to improve your overall athletic performance, firm up your core, and increase your muscular power and stamina. Use of the medicine ball will also help improve your coordination, balance and flexibility. 

The kit:

You will need a timer and a medicine ball for this full-body workout. Refer to the workout chart. This four-week circuit-style workout will keep you on your toes, and your heart rate going!

The list: 

The workout comprises six exercises that target all areas of the body. Start with the first exercise, complete as many reps as you can within the recommended amount of work time (see chart), rest for the recommended amount, then continue on to the next exercise. Repeat until all of the exercises are done. As the week’s progress, the circuit gets more challenging. Record your results so you can properly keep track of your progress.

For Weeks 1–2:

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 90 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times.

For Week 3: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times. 

For Week 4: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit three more times. 

Tip: For beginners, use a lighter weight medicine ball. For an extra challenge and to increase your power, use a heavier ball.

teresaworkout.jpg

Hit NEXT for the workout


1. Ball crunch with medicine ball throw 

teresacore_ballcrunch.jpg

Core, abs, shoulders

Lie flat on your back holding a medicine ball at chest level. Lift your shoulders off the floor and crunch. Once at the top of your crunch, throw the medicine ball forward to someone standing in front of you, or against a wall. Catch the ball on the bounce back, roll back down to starting position. Repeat and complete as many as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

NEXT: Alternating push-up


2. Alternating push-up on a medicine ball

teresacore_pushupalt.jpg

Core, chest 

Position yourself in a push-up position, placing one hand on top of the medicine ball and the other hand on the floor, slightly wider than shoulder-width. The arm that has the hand on the ball should be slightly bent. Perform a push-up by lowering your body down. As you straighten up, rapidly roll the ball under your body to the other hand, then perform another push-up again. Repeat this sequence for as many as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

NEXT: Glute bridge


3. Glute bridge on medicine ball

teresacore_glutebridge.jpg

Glutes, Hamstrings

Lie flat on your back and place both heels on top of the medicine ball. Push your heels down through the medicine ball and raise your hips up to a bridge position. Lower your hips back down to the starting position. Repeat and complete as many as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

NEXT: Ball slams


4. Ball slams

teresacore_ballslam.jpg

Core, Shoulder, Back 

Stand with your knees slightly bent and hold a medicine ball overhead, with your arms extended. Bend forward at the waist and use your core muscles to slam the ball against the floor about a foot in front of you. Retrieve the ball and repeat as many times as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

NEXT: Lunges and overhead press

 


5. Lunge and overhead press

teresacore_lunge.jpg

Lower body, glutes, shoulders, arms

Stand up straight with feet together. Hold a medicine ball in front of your chest with both hands. Lunge forward by taking a big step forward with your right foot. Lower your hips straight down so your torso is perpendicular to the floor and your weight is on the right foot. Return to starting position, then lift the medicine ball straight over your head. Repeat the movement with your left foot. Repeat the entire sequence for as many reps as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

NEXT: Squats

 


6. Squat

 

teresacore_squat.jpg

Lower body, glutes, quads, shoulders 

Stand with your knees slightly bent and hold a medicine ball with both hands. Fully extend your arms straight out in front of your body at shoulder level and perform a full squat. Return to the start position. Repeat and complete as many as you can in the recommended amount of work time.

{nomultithumb}

 

Core blast with Tiffiny Hall

Sculpt your core with this five move core workout by January 2018 cover model Tiffiny Hall.

GEAR: none! GO: 20 seconds’ work, 10 seconds’ rest, 4–6 rounds (push yourself!)

1. V-snap to push-up with a sexy roll

TiffHallCore-01-a-Situp-to-pushup.jpg

What a move! This exercise works your whole body, focusing on your core and adding a cardio twist. We all know we can’t spot-reduce fat, so it makes sense to combine a core-strengthening exercise with full-body function movements to burn calories, right?

» First up, the V-snap. Lie on your back, pushing your belly button down into your spine so there is no space between your lower back and the floor. 

» Lift your arms over your head and perform a sit-up. At the same time, lift your legs (keep them straight) to make a V with your bod and reach for your toes. This is the snap!

» Lower your arms and legs slowly.

» Now for the sexy roll. Roll over so you end up in a push-up position. The trick is to roll on your elbow and forearm, and to roll fast! The faster we move, the more calories we burn. 

» Perform one push-up (knees or toes), lower your body to the ground and sexy-roll back to starting position, ready to throw your arms over your head and snap again!


2. Plank butt kicks

TiffHallCore-02-b-Plank-butt-kicks.jpg

This move not only builds strength through the core, but by adding the butt kicks you’re getting a hit of cardio. You can see why this is one of my faves!

» Start in a planking position on your forearms and elbows, butt down and hips up.

» Your body should form a straight line from shoulders to ankles like, well, a plank.

» Engage your core by sucking your belly button into your spine. If you’re on struggle street, don’t drop your hips or arch your back, simply push your butt up to the sky.

» Hold and add the special ingredient: butt kicks! One leg at a time, bring your foot up to your butt, kick it, then lower your foot back to the ground. Alternate legs, go as fast as you can, but don’t lose that planking form!


3. Guard sit-up with jab, cross punches

TiffHallCore-cross-punches.jpg

This is the ab-solute best move for strengthening your core, while the cross body punches work the oblique muscles too. And you know what they say (well, what I say at least), tight obliques will cinch in that waist – like a belt.

» Start on your back with your feet together (heels touching), tucked up towards your butt and your knees pointing to the side – like a butterfly. 

» Keeping your guard up to your chin, perform a sit-up. As your shoulders pass over your hips, reach one arm across your body in a punch, then the other arm.

» Curl your spine back down to the floor, making sure you keep your belly button pulled into your spine.


4. Round-the-world guard sit-ups 

TiffHallCore-04-a-Round-the-world-guard-crunches.jpg

We use this one in taekwondo for ground self-defence, but it’s an awesome ab/cardio workout too – who knew! Make sure you keep your belly button stapled to your spine to engage the core. And no cheating! That means hands kept firm in guard position rather than using them for momentum. 

» Lie on your back with your guard up and raise your knees up to your chest.

» Lift your hips and lead with your butt to pivot your hips to one side.

» Continue to lift your hips, pivot your butt to the side and crunch the abs in a circular motion so that you wind around. And don’t forget to breathe (exhale as you crunch)!

» Complete one 360-degree round of these, then onto anticlockwise.


5. High knees with boxing oblique twists

Core-05-b-High-knees-with-boxing-oblique-twists.jpg

Twisting through the trunk helps to slim the waist and work the core and obliques so you achieve beautiful curves through the midsection, while high knees make this move cardio – so you strengthen your abs while burning belly fat. Win, win!

» Hands in a guard position, snug under your chin, elbows pointing to your hips and your forearms facing the front. Run on the spot, lifting your knees up high to your belly button. 

» Now, add in upper-body twists side to side so your elbow meets the opposite knee.

Remember: knees high, hips forward and most importantly, pull the belly button into your spine to switch on your core. Now lift those knees soldier, high like your heart rate! 

NEXT: Looking for more high-intensity workouts? Try this gym free workout today.

 

{nomultithumb}

 

Top tips for a pain-free Brazilian wax

 

Before you head to your next Brazilian appointment, prepare yourself with these simple tips and avoid the discomfort. 

» Avoid coffee before your appointment. This stimulant can make the waxing more uncomfortable. 

» Exfoliate and moisturise the area regularly. Dry skin and clogged pores will lead to ingrown hairs.

» Exfoliate before your appointment.

» Do not exercise after your waxing appointment as you will risk getting ingrown hairs. 

» Wear cotton underwear and loose, breathable clothing when possible to avoid the risk of in-growns, particularly immediately following your appointment.

» Do not pick ingrowns. You’re at greater risk of scarring and infection. 

» Apply a diluted tea tree solution to ingrown hairs. Other topical solutions are available from your chemist. 

» Moisturisers or oils with lavender or tea tree are great for regular use to maintain smooth skin as well as to treat and prevent ingrown hairs.

» If you’re attempting to wax at home, patch test first to ensure against irritation by any of the ingredients. 

» Pull swiftly against the direction of hair growth while holding skin tight. 

» Do not wax over the same area twice. 

{nomultithumb}

 

8 move booty workout

 

Shape, tighten and lift your butt in just eight moves with this focused resistance workout from fitness model Janine Horsley. 

Warm-up (not pictured)

 

This dynamic warm-up will prepare your body for key moves. Consider it an investment.

2–3 minutes: (20 seconds each)

Begin with high knees, running in one place for 20 seconds. Followed with butt kickers, with heels kicking back to touch your butt, for 20 seconds. Lastly, fully extend arms and legs in a marching position. Perform jumping marches by jumping in sequence with arms and legs forward and back.

THE WORKOUT

1. Dumbbell step ups (7 to 13 kg)

 

3 sets x 12–15 reps (20 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-dumbbellstep.jpg

 

Start movement holding dumbbell at chest level with elbows tucked in. Place one leg on a platform or bench and thrust up on to bench. The key to this movement is pushing off with the opposite toe on the floor before lifting and keeping weight on the heel on the bench when stepping down. Perform all the reps on the one side before switching legs.

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 


 

 

 

 

2. Kettlebell Overhead Squats (7 to 11 kg)

 

3 sets x 12 reps (30 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-kettlebelloverhead.jpg

 

Start movement holding a kettlebell with both hands at waist level. When you are ready, engage core, lift kettlebell above your head, and squat parallel to the floor. The key to this movement is engaging the stomach and locking the arms overhead and exhaling as you power up through the squat. Perform with toes slightly pointed out, shoulder-width apart. Keep the arms fully extended above your head until you have completed all the reps for that set.

 

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 

 


 

 

3. Kettlebell Crossover Reverse Lunge (4 to 9 kg)

3 Sets x 10 reps (30 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-kettlesquat.jpg

 

Start movement holding a kettlebell at chest level with both hands. Be sure to keep elbows tucked at sides. As you begin, take one leg back into a reverse lunge position in a 45-degree angle while maintaining an upright squat position. The key to this movement is an upright position and slowly crossing your leg in a reverse lunge while dropping the knee in a straight line down. Be sure to cross slowly to maintain your balance throughout the movement.

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 


 

 

 

 

4. Dumbbell Stiff-Legged Deadlift (9 to 13 kg)

3 sets x 12 reps (30 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-stiffleg.jpg

 

Start movement with dumbbells at waist level. Maintain a good posture with a slight bend in the knees and slowly lower the weight to the front of your calves, and return to the top of your thighs. The key to this movement is a flat back and slow and steady lowering of the weights.

 

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 


 

 

5. Dynamic Speed Skaters (2.5 to 4 kg)

 

3 sets x 45-to-60-second intervals (with 30 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-skaters.jpg

 

Start movement with one foot forward and one foot back. As you start in motion, hop into a side lunge position, then spring off and do the same to the other side. The key to this movement is not speed, but balance and coordination.

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 


 

 

 

6. Hamstring Ball Bridge (Body weight)

3 sets x 30-second intervals (with 20 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-hamstringbridge.jpg

 

Start movement lying flat on your back with your heels resting on the top of the balance ball. As you push down on the ball with your heels, pull the ball towards you and lift your hips straight up, and then slowly bring them down and let the ball move back to the starting position. The key to this movement is keeping your shoulders flat on the ground and squeezing the glutes as you lift the hips. Slow and steady is the game.

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

 


 

 

 

7. Cable Kickbacks – 2 sets x 12–15 reps each leg

(20 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-kickbacks.jpg

 

Attach the ankle loop to your ankle. Maintain an upright position with your upper body. Grab the sides of the cable machine, and thrust your leg back, no higher than your waist level, and slowly bring it back with a slight knee bend forward to finish. The key to this movement is slowly squeezing the glutes as you thrust the leg back.

 


 

 

 

8. Smith Machine Standing Calves 3 sets x 15–20 reps 

 

(20 seconds’ rest)

 

bootyworkout-calfraises.jpg

 

Start movement with Smith machine bar on your shoulders. Stand on a platform or step to raise and lower your calves. The key to this movement is a slow and full stretch on your toes and lower your heels to get the full benefit of the stretch. It is not about the weight, more the stretch and a slight pause at the top of the movement. 

 

Words/workout: Janine Horsley (pictured)

Photography: James Patrick 

NEXT: Want to focus on your glutes? Activate them with this booty-building workout.

 

{nomultithumb}

 

 

4-week full body circuit by Nichelle Laus

 

Work up a sweat, tone and sculpt with this four-week total body workout by WH&F trainer Nichelle Laus. 

The workout:

 

The following circuit can be performed three days per week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

On the other days between (Tuesday and Thursday) perform moderate cardio for 20 minutes.

 

 

Week 1:  Perform 2–3 sets of the circuit with 1 minute in between exercises.

 

Week 2: Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with 1 minute in between exercises.

 

Week 3:  Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with 30 seconds in between exercises.

 

Week 4: Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with as little time as possible between exercises.

1. Dumbbell single arm split squat to press

 

fullbodycircuit-nichelle-dumbbellsinglearm.jpg

 

Perform 8 reps per leg

 

Assume a split squat position with your left foot forward. Hold a moderately weighted dumbbell in your right hand. Hold the dumbbell at the height of your right shoulder and brace your core as you descend into the split squat. As you return to the standing position, press the dumbbell overhead. Repeat for the recommended repetitions and then switch your standing position so that your right leg is forward and the dumbbell is in your left hand.

Trainer tip:  The heel of your back foot will not come into contact with the floor. Your weight will be on the ball of your forefoot.

 

Photos by: Dave Laus 

Workout by: Nichelle Laus

Model: Nichelle Laus

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. TRX (or bodyweight resistance apparatus) bodyweight rows

 

fullbodycircuit-nichelle-TRX.jpg

 

 

Perform 10 reps

Maintain a neutral spine and good posture as you grasp the handles of the straps. Lean back slightly and push your hips forward so that your entire body is straight. Pull your upper body forward by bending your elbows. At the top position of the row, your hands should be at the level of your chest.

Trainer tip: You can make the exercise more difficult by walking your feet closer to the wall to bring your body more horizontal to the floor.

 

 

Photos by: Dave Laus 

Workout by: Nichelle Laus

Model: Nichelle Laus

 

 

 

 


 

 

3. Kettlebell swing

 

fullbodycircuit-nichelle-kettlebellswing.jpg

 

Perform 12 reps

Grasp the kettlebell by the handle with both hands while maintaining a flat back position and a tight core. You should feel tension through the back of your legs in this start position. As you slowly raise the bell from the floor, lower your torso and let the bell swing between your legs. Using the momentum created by the swing movement, stand up by thrusting your hips forward and letting the kettlebell rise to chest height. Generate momentum with each swing and be sure to maintain tight glutes and lats (upper back) in the top position.

 

 

Photos by: Dave Laus 

Workout by: Nichelle Laus

Model: Nichelle Laus

 

 


 

 

 

 

4. Low-Incline Alternate- Arm Dumbbell Press

 

fullbodycircuit-nichelle-alternatedumbbell.jpg

 

Perform 10 reps per arm

Lie on a bench with a slight incline (30 degrees or less). Raise both dumbbells to the top position of the bench press movement so that your arms are straight overhead. Maintain this straight arm position with one arm while you lower one dumbbell and return it to the top position. Alternate arms for the total indicated reps.

 

 

Photos by: Dave Laus 

Workout by: Nichelle Laus

Model: Nichelle Laus

 

 


 

 

 

 

5. Swiss ball stir the pot

 

fullbodycircuit-nichelle-swissball.jpg

 

Perform for 30 seconds

Place your forearms on the Swiss ball with your feet on the floor, slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Maintain a neutral spine by keeping your hips from sagging to the floor. Keeping this position, move your forearms in a figure 8 sequence under control while maintaining your posture.

 

Photos by: Dave Laus 

Workout by: Nichelle Laus

Model: Nichelle Laus

 

Looking for more full body workouts? Check out the Base Body Babes full body circuit.

 

{nomultithumb}

 

How to treat skin rashes

 

Skin rashes can come about from a number of triggers. Here are a few treatments to keep in mind when they come about.

Treatment options vary depending on what instigated it; however, generally when a rash surfaces it will appear “itchy, red and blotchy”, says GP Dr Joe Kosterich.
Kosterich. 

Pharmacy treatment: Moisturising creams and emulsifying ointments

How it works:

Priceline pharmacist Monica Soliman recommends gentle moisturising cream as the first point of treatment for irritated, dry skin. Simply apply it liberally to provide relief. “Look for products that contain sorbolene or aqueous cream,” Soliman says. For more severe cases an emulsifying ointment is also an option.

Warnings: These treatments need to be reapplied frequently, which can be time consuming. The lack of active ingredients also means it’s a slow healing process.

Pharmacy treatment: Topical antifungal treatment

How it works: “A fungal rash is usually intensely itchy, characterised by a visible red ring on the skin,” Soliman says. To treat it Soliman recommends using products that contain ingredients clomitrazole and miconazole. “These creams work either by inhibiting the growth or spread of a fungus, or by killing the fungus completely.”

Warnings: While the fungus is present, the cream should be applied twice daily; however, the real work comes after the visible symptoms have gone. Soliman says you should continue using the treatment for “two weeks to make sure the fungus is eradicated”.

NEXT: Discover 6 beauty tips for a summer ready body.

{nomultithumb}

 

3 ways to target your core

 

Sculpt your core with this efficient core workout by Kayla Gagnon. 

The workout

 

Using a timer set for 30 seconds of work and 10 to 15 seconds of rest

3 to 4 rounds of each move 

1. Side plank hip dips

 

ab-core-sideplankhipdip.jpg

 

 

Hold yourself up in a side plank (either from the knees or toes) Using control, lower the bottom hip to the floor with an inhale. As you exhale, push the hips back up to the ceiling.

 


 

 

 2. Plank pike-up

 

ab-core-plank.jpg

 

Begin in a plank position with elbows and toes on the floor and body raised parallel to the floor. As you inhale, slowly walk your toes in towards your chest, keeping your legs straight as your hips raise to the ceiling. Pause at the peak and exhale your way down to neutral position.

 

 


 

 

3. Seated X crunch 

 

ab-core-seatedcrunch.jpg

 

 

 

Begin in a tall seated position with your legs fully extended and your arms reaching straight to the ceiling. As you exhale, keeping everything as straight as you can, bring your left foot and your right hand together for the crunch. Repeat on the other side.

Looking for more ab workouts? Check out our full library of sculpting workouts. 

 

{nomultithumb}

 

8 essential tips for dyeing your hair

 

Are you in need of a hair revamp? Before you jump on the boxed hair dyes, here are eight things to keep in mind before you dye your hair at home.

1. Check the ingredients

Filling your car with the wrong type of petrol can cause serious damage to your vehicle, so it’s important for you the read the signs. The same concept can be applied to dying your hair. According to Vince Sferlazza, owner of Vince and John New Image Salon in Melbourne, it’s crucial to check how many chemicals are in the hair dye to avoid damaging your locks. “The fewer chemicals there are, the better it will be for your hair, so always be sure to check,” says Sferlazza. “Strong chemicals like ammonia shock the hair shaft open, leaving it looking dry and dull after a colour. Herbatint hair colours gently open the shaft of the hair to deposit colour while maintaining the shine and health of your hair.”

2. Opt for natural botanicals

Hair dyes that contain natural botanical ingredients help to restore moisture throughout the dyeing process. “It’s a synergy between nature and technology; different botanicals have different uses,” says Sferlazza. “They can protect the scalp, add shine, moisturise the hair and skin, enhance colour, strengthen and soothe. So ensure that all your hair products are enriched with certified organic extracts.”

WHF pick: restore moisture with Herbatint’s range of hair dyes, which contain aloe vera to protect and nourish, and meadow foam to moisturise and add shine and condition.

3. Select your colour wisely

To find a shade that suits your complexion, Sferlazza recommends picking a colour that’s a few shades lighter or darker than your natural tone. While you can play it safe with the base colour, don’t be afraid to have a little fun with highlights. “You can always play with tones, add some warmer tones, like copper and mahogany, or cooler tones, like ash, to your natural colour to enhance your skin tone.”

4. Prep your space

Before you embark on a DIY colouring session at home, ensure you’ve prepped your space and have the right equipment. “Make sure surfaces are covered and you have all the right tools for the job: a colouring cape, old towel, measuring cup, tint bowl, tint brush and a comb,” says Sferlazza. “And make sure you aren’t wearing your Sunday best when you’re applying your colour.”

5. Read the instructions

While this seems like an obvious tip, you’d be surprised how many people don’t actually read the instructions from start to finish. And perform a skin test to ensure you don’t have an allergic reaction to the product.

6. Show your locks some love

So, you’ve dyed your hair and you love the new colour, but the hair care doesn’t stop there. It’s important to use products that will nourish and restore moisture. “It’s in your best interest to invest in products containing natural ingredients to restore the hair after colouring,” says Sferlazza. “Allow yourself five to 10 minutes when washing your hair to leave the Herbatint Royal Cream Conditioner on as an intensive regenerating treatment.”

WHF top pick: Herbatint’s Normalising Shampoo and Royal Cream Conditioner. Enriched with aloe vera, jojoba and wheat germ, it nourishes and revitalises dry, damaged and colour-treated hair.

7. Space out your colouring

It’s tempting to reach for the colouring brush as soon as re-growth starts to show. But Sferlazza advises waiting a minimum or four to five weeks between colourings to allow your hair enough time to repair itself.

8. Practise long-term hair care

While many will admit to getting extremely irregular haircuts, they’re vital for healthy, glossy hair. Sferlazza recommends getting regular haircuts every six to eight weeks and using a good-quality hair brush. Also, avoid overusing hair dryers and straighteners, but if you are using them, always use a heat-protecting serum or cream.

WHF pick: TEK wooden hairbrushes help stimulate blood flow to the scalp, promoting hair growth.

Discover more about Herbatint’s philosophy and you’ll be on your way to having lucious, healthy locks.

 

{nomultithumb}

 

6 ways to manage PMS

 

PMS is no fun. Here, we share six ways to help and manage your PMS.

1. Food

Stabilising blood sugar will favour consistent energy levels and moods according to dietitian Melanie McGrice (melaniemcgrice.com.au). “Grains that have a low glycaemic index, which means that they provide longer-lasting energy, can also help to increase the hormone serotonin in the brain, so try some chickpeas, brown rice or quinoa,” says McGrice.

2. Diet

According to accredited practising dietitian Lisa Yates, some studies show that PMS may be exacerbated by too much caffeine, sugar and alcohol. To minimise symptoms, she suggests that you reduce your alcohol, caffeine and salt intake, and follow a low-GI diet.

3. Supplements

Professor Kulkarni says supplements such as evening primrose oil can be effective for relieving PMS symptoms and favours these as a primary intervention before resorting to the contraceptive pill. “The two supplements I suggest are vitamin B6 and evening primrose oil, which has healthy essential fatty acids. Both supplements have been shown in studies to help alleviate some symptoms in women with PMS and many women benefit from them,” Prof Kulkarni says. A study published in 2010 found that the combination of magnesium and vitamin B6 was particularly helpful for decreasing PMS symptoms. “Nuts are rich in both magnesium and B6, so I’d recommend taking 30 g unsalted nuts daily in the week prior to your period,” says McGrice.

Correcting iron deficiency may also ease syptoms as women who consume insufficient iron are at higher risk of suffering PMS according to University of Massachusetts research. Women with higher non-heme iron, which comes from plant sources, are 30 to 40 per cent less likely to experience PMS. This is possibly because low iron affects levels of serotonin, the hormone that elevates mood. Good sources of non-heme iron include silverbeet and spinach, broccoli, bok choy, soybeans and lentils.

4. The Pill

Contraceptive pills can help ameliorate symptoms of severe PMS and PMDD, but not all pills are equally effective. “Women should not take older-style progesterone pills as these can actually contribute to emotions like anger and depression,” warns Prof Kulkarni. “Some of the newer varieties of pill such as Zoely, Diane and Juliet can be very beneficial.”

To establish a more stable hormonal pattern, women may take the pill with the active hormones for three cycles then go on to a sugar pill for one week only, so that within a three-month cycle they only have one week of bleeding.

5. Hormone therapy

The next line of defence is hormone therapy according to Prof Kulkarni. Oestrogen patches or oestradiol patches and progesterone can cause a kind of hormone detour. “For some women who are very sensitive to hormones, another alternative is to deliver the progesterone via the Mirena IUD, which is placed in the uterus. This allows the hormones to go directly into the surrounding organs rather than passing through the bloodstream first, where it may cause more side effects,” Prof Kulkarni says.

6. Antidepressants

For women who feel their lives are hijacked by hormones every month, antidepressants can provide enormous relief. “The antidepressants stabilise the level of hormones like serotonin, so some women with PMS or PMDD no longer experience those huge mood swings from hormonal fluctuations,” says Davison. 

A new approach to this treatment is to take the antidepressant intermittently. “It may be taken for one week or 10 days of each month when symptoms occur,” says Prof Kulkarni. “To ensure the dose and type of antidepressant suits your system, speak to your GP about having a blood test or swab to get background on your metabolic system and guide the choice of antidepressant.” 

If antidepressants are not effective, women who suffer severe symptoms of PMS may then choose to undergo a ‘chemical menopause’, where strong hormones are used to stop ovulation and give women a break from the terrible hormonal and mood swings. “This approach sometimes needs to be permanent but can also have a kind of resetting effect on the brain,” Prof Kulkarni explains. “If women choose to come off the hormones, their impact is usually reversible and even when no longer on the therapy, the hormonal-related moods swings may be greatly reduced.” 

 

{nomultithumb}